My very best friends

April 15, 2020

Share

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
staff with adults with disabilities

Sometimes I forget how completely lucky I am. The other day while riding the bus downtown with some of our participants, I watched a woman with her two small children. She looked exhausted as she attempted to calm them, reminding them to sit down; I could hear the frustration in her voice at times. As our ride continued, I watched as she became more aware of our participants around her. She watched them say hello to her children. She watched them try to help her calm her crying son by making silly faces and saying “it’s okay, don’t cry”. Then I watched. I watched her body physically relax as she admired our participants. I watched her smile as she witnessed our participants laugh, hug each other, vocally share their excitement and eagerly look out the window at the buildings and people going by. I watched such a beautiful revelation. When our gazes finally met, she said, in the sweetest and most sincere way, “It’s so great they are able to appreciate the ordinary things in life; we all need to do more of that.”

Not everyone reacts this way. I used to get upset when I met people who make it clear that they ‘feel bad’ for the people I support. You can see it in their face and hear it in their voice. Those poor people. But in recent years, I no longer get upset. Instead, I simply ‘feel bad’ for those who feel that way.  “Those poor people” are some of my very best friends and teach me to appreciate the small things in life every single day. I am so lucky to have them in my life. I am so lucky to have friends who do not judge other people, who are so strong, despite the challenges they face, who show so much love to others, and who make my heart feel more full then I ever thought possible.

One of my favourite artists, Foy Vance, wrote a song called “Joy of Nothing”. There is something about finding the joy in absolutely nothing. Something we all need to strive to find daily. A special thank you to all our participants for making this so easy for me. I wish everyone was able to experience this kind of joy.

Stephanie - Program Director - Kitchener

Stephanie

Program Coordinator

staff with adults with disabilities

Bless the Murphys

Submitted by an Adults in Motion Family…. As we approach our 10th anniversary at Adults In Motion, we reflect on how grateful we are for

COVID ‘Face-Covering’ Opinions

The government of Canada has advice for us to wear ‘face masks’ to stop the spread of germs during COVID-19.  I totally get this and

friends with adults with disabilities

cAIMbridge saves the day!

Did you know there are hero’s among us!? Dressed in everyday AIM clothing? Check out this story…. For three years, Cambridge staff and participants have

Stephanie

Program Coordinator

Stephanie came to AIM with 15+ years of experience in the social services field and also has a brother with special needs. Stephanie has a Psychology/Sociology University degree and a diploma in Early Childhood Education. Even before her younger brother was born Stephanie had an interest in working with individuals with special needs. Stephanie has supported individuals in group homes, day programs, camps, and 1:1 support in the community. She has even been friends with a couple AIM participants for over 16 years! Stephanie also volunteered at Grand River Hospital and acted as an evening supervisor for KW’s Out of The Cold program for over 6 years. In November 2013, Stephanie received Extend-A-Family’s “Individual Inclusion Award” for an ‘I Choose Dignity’ video she made, along with being an advocate for individuals with special needs in our community.  Stephanie is so happy to be a part of the AIM team and is committed to providing exceptional support to the participants.

JOIN THE FUN!

PLEASE CHOOSE A LOCATION

VOLUNTEER AT AIM

PLEASE CHOOSE A LOCATION